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Suburi Explained - Wikipedia

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Suburi Explained - Wikipedia

Postby Francis Takahashi » Sat Jun 09, 2012 12:22 am

Suburi : From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Suburi (素振り?, lit: naked or unadorned swing[1]) is a Japanese word which is used to describe practice swings used in sports such as baseball, tennis, golf, and in martial arts. Outside of Japan, the word is used exclusively for repetitive individual cutting exercises used in Japanese martial arts such as kendo, aikido, iaidō, and kenjutsu. Often a shinai (for kendo), bokken, suburitō, or even tanren bō are used. An iaitō or shinken can also be used, albeit that is rare.

Some common types (these can vary between styles):

katate-suburi (片手素振り?)
holding the weapon with only the left hand (which is supposed to be used as the power hand)

haya-suburi (速素振り?)
rapid suburi where you cut on the forward motion and assume jodan on the return motion, feet should glide on the floor. Sometimes called choyaku-men

chōyaku-suburi (跳躍素振り?)
incorporating a coordinated jumping like movement with the strike

jōge-suburi (上下素振り?)
strikes with back swings that almost touch ones lower back and forward swings which almost touch the floor

naname-suburi (斜め素振り?)
alternating diagonal strikes, cutting across the opponent's torso, starting with a cut to the left

shōmen-suburi (正面素振り?)
strikes to an opponent's forehead

zenshin-kōtai-shōmen-suburi (前進後退正面素振り?)
strikes to an opponent's forehead, starting with forward, then backward.

sayū-men-suburi (左右面素振り?)
alternating strikes to an opponent's forehead, starting with your right-hand side.

Suburi is used as a warm up before actual practice begins[citation needed], usually done in sets of ten, though sometimes sets of 100 are used (especially with naname-suburi and shomen suburi).

Suburi serves to loosen the wrists (naname suburi) and elevate heart rate (haya suburi).
Francis Takahashi
 
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Re: Suburi Explained - Wikipedia

Postby Carina Rei » Tue Jun 12, 2012 5:14 am

Thanks Francis Sensei for reminding me of the interesting week Seminar in Wegimont, Belgium with Christian Tissier Shihan where we did every morning I think 100 shomen suburi as a warm up, or at least it seemed to me that much, it was in my beginning and got blisters in my hands
Carina Rei
 
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Location: Gran Canaria - Spain

Re: Suburi Explained - Wikipedia

Postby Francis Takahashi » Tue Jun 12, 2012 11:19 pm

What a painful, but important memory Carina. I recall that the late Shigenobu Okumura Shihan, 8th dan Aikikai, was in the habit of completing 1,000 suburi before entering his home after work each day. For decades, the AAUSA has had a New Year's Eve practice, culminating with 1,000 suburi at midnight.
Francis Takahashi
 
Posts: 411
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:51 pm

Re: Suburi Explained - Wikipedia

Postby Carina Rei » Wed Jun 13, 2012 12:08 am

An interesting habit of Shigenobu Okumura Shihan, he sure would sleep like a child afterwards, should recommend it for people who suffer sleeplessness...
And I think that the New Year's Eve practice of AAUSA is very nice and then a toast for the coming year...
Carina Rei
 
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 12:50 am
Location: Gran Canaria - Spain


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