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On being humble

Sensei's thoughts and writings

On being humble

Postby Francis Takahashi » Sun Jul 27, 2014 2:56 pm

In Japanese, the word for humility is "Kenson". The phrase "kenson na" refers to the state of exemplifying humility, or being humble and unassuming.

Rather than necessarily being a virtue required of a martial artist, I believe that the concept of humility is a universally appreciated and prized virtue for mankind in general. Perhaps for a martial artist, or one who seriously studies a particular Way of Budo, it can be an essential goal for that student to genuinely appraise his skills, and their relevance in the society in which he travels.

For me, the very nature of dealing with one's ego, is to correctly and reasonably cultivate this most necessary of one's character strong points, in the pursuit of a complete, balanced achievement of personal growth and accomplishment. To truly be strong and survive, one must find ways to use all of one's talents, skill sets, and the wisdom from utilizing them on a daily basis, in the challenging pursuit of personal excellence.

For anyone who would seek to be an accomplished martial artist in this age and dimension, there are far more challenges to face and to handle than for previous generations.The sheer size of knowledge and technological advances itself can require a lifetime of work and study to understand . To then fashion a separate career of study from the million possibilities that now exist, not including the variations that are also possible for any one of them, is overwhelming to a simple mind such as i possess. To appropriately and wisely concede to such an understanding, may be an example of being humble and appreciative of what reality confronts us with on our lifelong journey.

I consider the idea of being humble to be a useful tool to employ in our daily activities, and in our mindful interactions with others. It can be included in the entire arsenal of talents, skills and strategies we may organize for ourselves, and our plans of action. It is not necessarily a vital one, as each person must choose what combination of personal attributes will best suit their ambitions and dreams of achievement, paths to their individual goals, and to happiness.

To grow successfully as a martial artist, even to grow successfully as a complete human being, is a matter of daily assessment of what is possible vs. what is not. To accurately assess and employ strategies that do not guarantee, but reasonably promise the best results, is all we can ask for.

So, if being humble at the appropriate time works for you, good luck, and god speed.
Francis Takahashi
 
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Re: On being humble

Postby Carina Rei » Mon Jul 28, 2014 10:45 am

Thank you Takahashi Shihan for this thoughtful article, what makes us also reflect.

I always thought that humble persons denotes their wisdom, moreover if the person also doesn't show or boast of his/her knowledge, but it is not to overlook, this person is really to admire. Usually a humble person wealthy or not, doesn't need much to live a satisfying life, he/she also likes nature and quiet places. As you say it is a virtue necessary to cultivate and a strong point of our character for our personal growth and wellbeing.
Carina Rei
 
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 12:50 am
Location: Gran Canaria - Spain

Re: On being humble

Postby Carina Rei » Tue Aug 05, 2014 5:27 am

The translations were deleted
Carina Rei
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 12:50 am
Location: Gran Canaria - Spain


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